To continue the video releases from MAD4, we present Paul Freedman’s “Celebrity Chefs, Past and Present.” Freedman has been a professor of history at Yale University since 1997, where one of his areas of focus is the history of cuisine. In 2007, he edited Food: The History of Taste, an illustrated collection of essays about food from prehistoric to contemporary times.

Read More

Last sunday, chefs Christian Puglisi (Relae and Manfreds, Copenhagen), Niklas Ekstedt (Ekstedt, Stockholm), Isaac McHale (The Clove Club, London), and Gabriela Cámara (Contramar, Mexico City) took part in a MAD discussion at the annual Food Festival in Aarhus, Denmark. The discussion was moderated by British journalist Joe Warwick. We now have audio of the entire conversation, which you can now listen to here: 

Read More

The first video we’re releasing from this year’s Symposium is the segment that opened the event: a demonstration of soba-making from Tatsuru Rai, the chef and owner of Hokkaido’s Rakuichi Soba. Tatsuru operates the 12-seat restaurant, considered one of the world’s greatest soba houses, with his wife Midori. He mixes, kneads, and cuts all of the buckwheat to order. 

Read More

After 5 hours inside a tent listening to a dizzying array of talks, it’s a special thing to walk outside during the first break of the day and get assaulted with deliciousness. That’s exactly what happened over the two days of MAD, when three forces from Brazil cooked lunch on day one, and former MAD speaker Roy Choi prepared a feast for day two. 

Some background: on day one, we had Rodrigo Oliveira, whose everyday eatery outside of Sao Paulo, Mocotó, is anything but ordinary; Thiago Castanho, of the restaurant Remanso do Bosque in Belem; and David Hertz. Joining them were members of Gastromotiva, an organization founded by Hertz that offers disadvantaged youth in Brazil free courses in the craft and business of cooking. 

For those who may be unfamiliar, Choi is the rising star chef from Los Angeles who first gained notoriety by serving Korean-inspired tacos from a truck all over his city. Last year, he gave one of the most impactful talks of MAD3, and this year, he returned to cook lunch and announce a new fast food project with Daniel Patterson that aims to bring nutritious, thoughtful, and delicious food to those who normally don’t have access to it.

Here are some scenes from both of the meals, including the menus: 

Read More

Yesterday we thanked the speakers, attendees, and volunteers of MAD4, and today we want to shift our focus to those involved in the coffee and beer programs for the symposium. The beverage offerings have become such an important part of the event over these last few years. It’s the result of painstaking work from some of the brightest people in this industry. 

Read More

In the lead-up to MAD4, we chose not to reveal the names of those who would take the stage during the symposium. It was our hope that this would allow guests to enter the tent with an open mind, ready for a surprise and focused on the theme, “What Is Cooking?” 

MAD4 has now come and gone, and very soon, we will start posting all the content from the symposium, including the essays from the MAD Dispatches book we published for the event. Before that, though, we want to formally give the speakers who traveled from far and wide their due. Below is the full lineup of the event, including biographical information. We thank the speakers from the bottom of our hearts for joining us this year.

We would also like to express our gratitude to all of the volunteers and cooks involved in the production, and, of course, to the attendees. The fact that so many people take time out of their schedules and spend money to travel to Copenhagen every year is never lost on us. Without it, there simply can be no MAD.

Please keep your eyes on this space, as well as our Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages, in the coming weeks. There’s a lot of content coming your way. 

Read More

Just a few moments ago, Daniel Patterson and Roy Choi took to the stage at MAD4 and announced that they will be launching loco’l, a concept that aims to supplant the fast-food chains and convenience stores that separate our youth from the taste of real food. The first branch will launch on the west coast in the spring of 2015. Here’s Patterson on a few details. Stay tuned for more news on this collaboration and its efforts:

Read More

Two weeks after our annual symposium, we’ll be hosting a discussion at the Food Festival in Århus, Denmark. The topic: “Originality and Idea Theft in the Kitchen.”

Entry is free, as long as you have a ticket to the festival, but you must register on our site, madfeed.co, on this coming Monday 18 August at noon CEST to secure a place. To buy a ticket to the Food Festival, please visit the official site. Three-day passes are 150 DKK, while single day entry is 75 DKK.

Below you’ll find a description of the topic, as well as information on the panelists.

Read More

We continue to look forward to MAD4 by looking back at notable speeches from years past. Time for a classic: Ben Shewry’s “Cycle of Love.”

Read More

"I’ve never been good at anything so, naturally, I ended up being good at advertising," said the author and ad exec Knud Romer at the beginning of his speech at last year’s MAD. The relentlessly self-deprecating Romer, who insists he knows nothing about food and most recently moderated a MAD Monday on the future of food criticism, presented a largely autobiographical talk at MAD3 about the guts it takes to be honest.

Read More

In the weeks leading up to MAD4, we’ll be sharing videos from the last three symposiums to refresh people’s memory and get them in the mood for what’s to come in August. Today, we unearth three very different presentations from MAD3: the talks of author Jon Reiner, glaciologist Jason Box, and Aboriginal forager Josh Whiteland.

Read More

Read More

Today chef Margot Henderson runs one of the most pleasant and delicious places in London, the Rochelle Canteen. You can go there from the morning until the late afternoon, eat beautifully cooked meat, nurturing braises, bright and lovely salads, and perfect puddings. It’s smart, confident food that’s everything you need when you want to feel like you’re eating in England’s capital.

Henderson actually grew up in New Zealand, where she landed in kitchens when she dropped out of college. She was trying to scrape up enough money to end up in the UK and figure out what she really wanted to do with her life.

Here’s what happened:

Read More

The Danish thinker and writer Tor Nørretranders has played an instrumental role in MAD’s development over the past four years. Today, in the first installment of our new series From The Vault, we’d like to share his three talks from the symposium. All of the presentations explore similar themes and build on the argument that gaining knowledge and exploring the edible world will lead to a more delicious future. 

Read More

In the latest entry in our continuing series on chefs’ first days in restaurant kitchens (see previous entries with Dominique Crenn and Michel Bras), Mario Batali remembers his unlikely beginnings.

The chef who has broken into the public consciousness perhaps more widely than any of his contemporaries — serving as the subject of an acclaimed book by Bill Buford, running successful restaurants throughout the globe, and hosting one of the most popular shows on daytime television — Batali entered the kitchen to chase girls. In the late 1970s, after enrolling at Rutgers University, he asked for a job at Stuff Yer Face, a pizzeria in town that’s still in business today. 

Here’s Mario explaining how it all happened: 

Read More